The HK+ Mobility Humanities Institutes publishes a research series (Assemblage), a translation series (Interconnect), and a public education series (Engagement).
Interconnect
Encountering Difference

Encountering Difference

Author
Robin Cohen ・ Olivia Sheingham
Translator
Youngseok Choi
Publisher
LP Publication (Seoul, South Korea)
Released
2019. 02. 28.

Translated from...​

This book is a Korean translation of the book titled Encountering Difference by Robin Cohen and Olivia Sheingham (Polity, 2016)
다름과 만나기, a Korean translation of the book, Encountering Difference by Robin Cohen and Olivia Sheingham (Polity, 2016)​, is published as a part of the INTERCONNECT BOOK SERIES, one of the book series by the Academy of Mobility Humanities, which selects and translates some of the seminal books originally written in non-Korean languages in order to introduce to interested audiences and researcher communities in Korea the significant trends and developments in mobility studies along with the mobility humanities abroad.
The book, 다름과 만나기, examines how people from diverse backgrounds learn to live with diversity and difference considering seminal concepts in transnational migration studies and beyond such as identity, diaspora and creolization. Moving across multi-disciplinary theories in history, cultural anthropology, sociology and human geography, the authors show how understanding and living with difference are one of the key challenges of the high-mobility society in the twenty-first century.

From the editorial reviews on the original book

This is one of those rare books which is both erudite, eloquent and existentially engaging. The authors embark on a journey through culturally variegated landscapes, addressing the human condition and the contemporary world as they go along, asking how people are able to live with diversity; and they generously invite the reader to take part in this conversation, which is so crucial for the future of humanity on this shrinking planet of ours. - Thomas Hylland Eriksen (University of Oslo)
This book offers a fresh perspective in shifting the focus from human conflict to how people 'make a life together'. To navigate the difficult terrain of a diverse world, it provides readers with a pair of carefully articulated concepts as guiding lights: while diaspora looks backwards to shared heritage and homeland, creolization gives weight to the forward-looking, creative energies inherent in culture contact. - Brenda S. A. Yeoh (National University of Singapore)